THE PANTRY

El Secreto de Chimiche specialises in the comforting, glowing embers that awaken the primordial impulses of appetite, and it excels in the elegance of evocative and creative dishes that combine tradition with modernity, tending always to return to the roots and celebrate the local harvest. There is a solid team who are passionate about good restaurant cuisine. And the ingredients from the local Chasna area are prominent, the key produce comes from this arid terrain which, at the mercy of the climate, provides the tastiest food.

sección despensa
vino

Gofio

pimientos

Red peppers

tomate

Tomatoes

queso

Cheeses

ajos

Garlic

aceite

Arico Olive Oil

cabrito

Young goat kid

vino

Wines

berenjenas

Aubergines

cebolla

Onion

aromáticas

Culinary herbs

calabaza

Pumpkin

papas

Coloured potatoes

mangas

Mangas

granada

Grenade

cherry

Cherry tomatoes

plátano

Bananas

azafrán

Safflower

batata

Sweet Potato

carne

Matured meats

pescado

Salted fish

parchita

Passion fruit

judias

Beans

aguacate

Avocado

orégano

Oregano

vino

Gofio

pimientos

Red peppers

tomate

Tomatoes

queso

Cheeses

ajos

Garlic

pescado

Salted fish

orégano

Oregano

aceite

Arico Olive Oil

cabrito

Young goat kid

vino

Wines

berenjenas

Aubergines

cebolla

Onion

parchita

Passion fruit

aromáticas

Culinary herbs

calabaza

Pumpkin

papas

Coloured potatoes

mangas

Mangas

granada

Grenade

judias

Beans

cherry

Cherry tomatoes

plátano

Bananas

azafrán

Safflower

batata

Sweet Potato

carne

Matured meats

aguacate

Avocado

vino

Gofio

pimientos

Red peppers

tomate

Tomatoes

queso

Cheeses

ajos

Garlic

aceite

Arico Olive Oil

cabrito

Young goat kid

vino

Wines

berenjenas

Aubergines

cebolla

Onion

aromáticas

Culinary herbs

calabaza

Pumpkin

papas

Coloured potatoes

mangas

Mangas

granada

Grenade

pescado

Salted fish

judias

Beans

orégano

Oregano

cherry

Cherry tomatoes

plátano

Bananas

azafrán

Safflower

batata

Sweet Potato

carne

Matured meats

parchita

Passion fruit

aguacate

Avocado

Gofio

This is a pre-Hispanic food, of Berber origin, consumed by the indigenous Canarian people as a fundamental part of their diet. In Tenerife it was called ahorenbut it was on the islands of Lanzarote and Gran Canaria where they used the name that has lasted to this day. The ancient Canarians made different types of gofio, using barley, wheat, lentils and even fern rhizomes.

Arico Olive Oil

From the Cumbres de Abona winery, a new line of produce has been launched in the region. The establishment of the olive grove has become a source of revenue and resources for the Abona area. The initiative has been successfully adopted by the local farmers, so much so that there are currently around 22,000 olive trees, mainly of the picual and rbequina varieties. And this is not counting the ornamental and wild trees that were already there, scattered throughout the whole island, inspiring the potential productive use of these trees.

Culinary herbs

Culinary herbs are widely used in cooking for their aromatic and seasoning qualities.  They are grown in different sized gardens and orchards. The term “fines herbes” usually refers to a mixture of four herbs: chives, chervil, tarragon and parsley that constitute the mainstay of French haute cuisine. If Canarian cuisine is known for anything in a nationwide context it would be for its flavours; any good stew is made with a good mixture of ground herbs and spices. The leaves of these herbs are usually used, whether fresh or dried, to season the stews and to enhance the aromas of various dishes, whether cooked or uncooked. Throughout history a lot of herbs have been largely ignored, except for mint, parsley and garlic. And some were only locally known.

Cherry tomatoes

The origin of the cherry tomato dates to the Aztecs of Mexico, at least back to the fifteenth century. The first tomatoes grown in Europe in the 16th century were yellow. These were grown in the botanical gardens of southern Spain. Cherry tomatoes became popular in the United States and Europe in the early 20th century. Lycopenes are a unique component in traditional cherry tomatoes; this is what gives them their characteristic red colour. Lycopenes are a type of carotene with antioxidant properties 10 times more effective than other classic antioxidants like vitamin E.

Salted fish

Salting is one of the oldest methods for preserving food. We know the ancient Egyptians were beginning to put the meats in salt in order to be able to store them and keep them edible for long periods of time. There is also evidence of similar uses in China in the third millennium BC.  The importance of salting made salt production and commercialisation one of the priorities of various powers since the times of the Roman Empire. This gives us the origin of the word salary, which is derived from the Latin salarium, which refers to the amount of salt given to a worker (particularly Roman legionnaires) in order to preserve their food (salarium argentum).

Red peppers

It is one of the key ingredients of our Mediterranean diet and features in many home cooking recipes. We are talking about the red pepper, which is a complete nutritious food and provides numerous benefits for your health. Being so high in vitamins and antioxidants, the red pepper is a powerful nourishment that helps fight aging and several serious diseases.

Young goat kid

If you are a lover of good meat you are in luck, you will find the young goat kid just irresistible. Kid meat is one of the great classics of Canarian cuisine. Prepared in various ways it is a healthy, easy-to-eat meat that is ideal for the charcoal grill.

Pumpkin

The pumpkin, if we use its widest definition is a berry with a hard rind. The best known are those of several genera of the Cucurbitaceae family which are usually climbing plants. All pumpkins are large. There are several genera of this type of fruit and apart from Lagenaria, of which we know little about how it reached the warm and temperate regions of the entire planet, the others have a somewhat more restricted distribution, although none are found in cold regions.

Bananas

Banana cultivation began in Southeast Asia, between India and Malaysia. In the 5th century it passed to the African continent from Madagascar and from there it spread along the shores of the Mediterranean sometime during the following century. It came to The Canary Islands from Equatorial Guinea when it was introduced by Portuguese explorers. History considers that once the crop was established on the islands, the Spanish introduced it to the American continent on the colonization trips to the New World.

Passion fruit

The passion fruit is oval or round, it is between 4 and 10 cm in diameter, very juicy but with some fibre. Its rind is thick and inedible. The pulp contains many small seeds along with a yellow, orange or greenish substance. The colour varies according to the variety, the most common type is yellow.   It is a climbing plant that can reach 9 meters in length, the stem is rigid, its leaves are large, evergreen, smooth and dark green. The roots are shallow. The flower of passion is white.  The taste of the passionflower is surprising, slightly acidic and very aromatic, it is rich in vitamins and minerals, with water as its main component.

Tomatoes

The tomato was one of the two main export crops in the Canary Islands throughout the twentieth century and greatly influenced the socioeconomic structure of the islands. Although there are references to tomato cultivation in the Canary Islands going back to at least 1850, it does not seem to have been consumed much outside of the upper classes. The tomato became quite popular in Britain in the late 19th century and together with the British presence in the Islands (especially shipping entrepreneurs), this led to the beginning of exportation of tomatoes from the Canary Islands.

Wines

The history of the vineyards and the wines of the Canary Islands is truly unique and interesting, and the mythology and legends are intertwined in its origins, as is the case with the history of our Archipelago. Horacio, half a century before Jesus Christ, alleged that “the unpruned vineyard continually flourished in The Fortunate Isles.” The adaptation and acclimatization of such diverse varieties made these imported vineyards prosper from the very beginning.

Coloured potatoes

The varieties of traditional old potatoes of the Canary Islands with Protected Designation of Origin are: Negrita de El Hierro, Buena Moza or Palmera, Blanca, Colorada, Corralera  Tijarafera,    Colorada,  Corraleda  Legítima, Carralera, Negra de La Palma, Negra Veteada, Rayada or Jorge, Haragana, De Ojo Azul, Blanca, Moñigo de Camello, De la Tierra, Azucena Negra, Azucena Blanca, Bonita Negra, Bonita Blanca, Bonita Colorada, Bonita Llagada, Bonita Ojo de Perdiz, Borralla, Colorada de Baba, Negra Yema de Huevo, Peluca Blanca, Peluca Negra, Peluca Roja y Terrenta.

There is no comparable product that has been able unite as much commitment and collaboration as the Canarian potato, indeed, this tuber is the gastronomic icon of the Canary Islands. This designation acknowledges not only the Canary Islands but the know-how of Canarian farmers.

Safflower

The safflower is one of humanity’s oldest crops. Chemical analyses of Ancient Egyptian fabrics dating back to the XII dynasty identified safflower dyes. Garlands made with the plant were also found in the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun. Long established on our islands, the safflower is a fundamental ingredient in stews, soups and marinades. In some areas of Tenerife it is also used in the traditional mojo sauces.

Beans

With beans, it is easy to appreciate all the different types there are, and the concept of biodiversity. There are so many different beans just here on the island of Tenerife. White, Black, Pinto, Yellow Manteca and Parral.

Some of these varieties have very curious names, named after objects which their shape or colour remind us of, with translations such as “Baker’s egg beans” and “Mantle of the Virgin”, both of which are white, dappled with red. And in some cases, it is the green pods that are eaten: the runner beans.

Cheeses

The Canarian cheeses are part of the cultural heritage of our Autonomous Community, their production depends on the commitment and labour of the farmers and master cheesemakers of the Islands whose exhaustive work  and dedication to procure the highest quality produce gives the cheese the characteristics that make it the showpiece of the gastronomy of the Canary Islands; a true culinary treasure. The varieties of cheeses from the Canaries are influenced by the different climates and landscapes around the Islands, as well as the excellent native breeds that guarantee the quality of milk, and of course, the care given by their farmers. These cheeses have an identity rich in traditions. This assortment of cheeses has characteristics in the crusts, the smells, the aromas and the flavours that distinguish them and give them their own distinct culture that is upheld by the Canarian Master Cheesemakers.

Aubergines

The aubergine, or the eggplant as they call it in America has awakened contradictory feelings in different places and different eras. The Romans and the inhabitants of central and northern Europe had resisted their charms for centuries, mainly due to their botanical affinity with some toxic plants (henbane, mandrake, belladonna…). Today it is treated with caution for its tendency to absorb fat during preparation. However, it is nourishing, with very beneficial properties for the digestion of fatty acids, blood pressure, kidney health and resistance to diseases  in general. No wonder aubergines feature in exquisite dishes from traditional cuisines in Asia, The Middle East, North Africa and southern Europe.

Mangas

The mango originates from north western India and northern Burma. It was first cultivated about five thousand years ago. Fortunately, mango cultivation has spread to all tropical and subtropical areas of the world, with Mexico being the world’s leading exporting country. Thanks to its peculiar and delicious taste, it is regarded as the king of tropical fruits. The tree can reach up to thirty meters in height, the trunk of grey bark is straight, cylindrical and 75-100 cm. in diameter. The fruits are oval, elongated and kidney-shaped or heart-shaped. The skin of the ripe fruit has colours ranging from green, yellow or orange to deep red. The pulp is yellowy orange, sweet, juicy and very tasty. It has a very different taste and texture from the rest of the table fruits and is considered to be the tropical fruit par excellence.

Sweet Potato

The sweet potato has always been in demanded, here on the island, and abroad. In Canarian gastronomy it is a prized ingredient, used in typical dishes such as Sancocho Canario. The sweet potato grown the traditional way in jable pumice is known for its quality. The exact origin of sweet potato is not very clear, although some authors place it in Central America. The varieties currently grown in Lanzarote are: la cubana, yema de huevo, la de seis meses and la del año.

Avocado

The avocado is both a fruit and a vegetable at the same time. It has an exquisite, soft hazelnut-like flavour and a tender and creamy consistency that can be combined with almost any food. The avocado tree is evergreen and comes from tropical and subtropical Central American areas.  Trees can reach a height of twenty meters, and do not produce fruit for the first four to seven years.

Garlic

Garlic is regarded as one of the most important healing vegetables. In recent years, there has been much more significance and awareness given to this vegetable, with a lot more information available about its properties. Consumption has increased and people are more informed, especially concerning how it works as a preventative and curative means of dealing with various illnesses. It is an essential ingredient in the Canarian cuisine and as a crop it is completely adapted to our environment.

Onion

In the last centuries the cultivation of onions has been one of the most deeply rooted among the insular agricultural population, since it not only allowed to cover the internal demand, but it could also be dedicated to exportation; however, it was never as well known as the potato and the grapevine.
The geographical situation of Tenerife and its particular orography, has allowed the development of a diverse agriculture, since there is such a variety of microclimates that almost all agricultural species find, even unintentionally, an area in which to thrive. This explains the rich variety of the island’s traditional crops, including onions.

Grenade

The pomegranate is a fleshy fruit with a thick, golden-orange rind; the interior of a pomegranate is divided into several chambers by a whitish membrane. Each receptacle houses numerous seeds, each of which is covered with a pink or red flesh; a juicy, refreshing flesh with a sweet and sour taste. It is a fruit of the Pomegranate tree, a tree that reaches four meters in height and whose fruits have prismatic and rough seeds. In ancient times, the bright flowers of the pomegranate tree were considered a symbol of love and the fruit an image of fertility.

Matured Meats

El mundo de la carne vacuna es sin duda el que más diversidad desarrolla dentro de la gastronomía; solo comparable al que nos ofrece el jamón ibérico. No tiene nada que ver con el que nos ofrecen otros animales como puedan ser el cordero o el cerdo, donde sus carnes ofrecen una regularidad mucho más pareja, algo que en el de la carne vacuna no se obtiene en ninguna de las partes del animal.

La chuleta, su parte más afamada desde hace unos años (antes lo fue el solomillo) desarrolla una singularidad inmensa, y los animales nos ofrecen constantes y constatables diferencias sin importar si son de la misma raza y han realizados desde hace años los mismos hábitos: alimentación, descanso o pastoreo.

Oregano

The word oregano comes from the Latin origanum and this one from the Greek oríganon; in Greek oros is mountain and the root gan- means to shine, to sparkle. It would be something like “brightness of the mountain”.
They are perennial plants and here very rare. The inhabitants who knew the location of these bushes kept the secret jealously, they collected it every year for their own consumption and to give some bunches to family and friends. It was used for the marinades of the usual slaughter, as a condiment and as medicinal plants.